Samaritan vs. Priest

gulu road

Luke 10:25-37 (NIV)

“A Ugandan woman was walking down a road when she was attacked by epilepsy. It stripped her of her dignity, slammed her head against the pavement, and left her lying in the middle of the road, unconscious.

I happened to be going down the same road, and when I saw the woman, I passed by on the other side. So too, others, when they came to the place and saw her, passed by on the other side.

But another man, as he traveled, came to where the woman was; and when he saw her, he took pity on her. He went to her and moved her to the side of the road. He gently woke her, and asked if she was alright. He collected her belongings and returned them to her. Then he supported the woman into his own car, brought her to a hospital, and made sure she would be taken care of.

Which of these people do you think was a neighbor to the woman on the road?”

They replied, “The one who had mercy on her.”

Jesus told them, “Go and do likewise.”

Priest

I like to think that I’m not one of those priests, but when I saw her I went through a host of excuses. I’ve had SO many things stolen from me in Uganda. If I let her into my car, she could take my computer, wallet, bag, books. If I pull over for every single person who needs help here, I’ll never get anything else done. I donate money to organizations who help women like this. They have long-term solutions, and my one-time handouts won’t solve the world’s problems.

Obviously this is a long conversation about colonialism, race, and aid efforts. But when actually confronted with a woman lying in the middle of the road, what would you do?

I unlocked the doors, Chris helped her into the car, and we drove to the hospital.

Samaritan

At the hospital, we learned that she was a regular. She slept there at night;  all the nurses knew her name. There wasn’t very much they could do to help her.

We watched as she shuffled away in her bare feet, our wallets and phones hidden safely in the locked car, and we wondered what more we should’ve done.

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One comment

  1. Brad Riegg · · Reply

    Really good, Keelia. Concise and true. The line most convicting to me was, “I donate money to organizations who help women like this. They have long-term solutions, and my one-time handouts won’t solve the world’s problems.” I guess if everyone just looked after One sole person in need all the world’s suffering that’s due to human sin, and much else besides, would vanish in a day.
    Thanks for sharing. Love, Dad-R

    Liked by 1 person

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